Our Favorite Books

Our Favorite Books

Our Favorite Books

You can purchase items from Amazon Smile and designate us as your beneficiary – we’ll get 0.5% of all purchases.  We’d love to be your charity of choice!  If you feel inspired to give outright, you can make a tax-deductible donation here. To make it easy for you, we thought we’d share our favorite books about health and healing: “Is This Your Child:  Discovering and Treating Unrecognized Allergies in Children and Adults” by Doris Rapp, M.D. “Healing the New Childhood Epidemics: Autism, ADHD, Asthma and Allergies: The Groundbreaking Program for the 4-A Disorders” by Kenneth Bock and Cameron Stauth “A Compromised Generation: The Epidemic of Chronic Illness in America’s Children” by Beth Lambert and Victoria Kobliner “Envisioning a Bright Future:  Interventions That Work for Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders“, Patricia S. Lemer “The Thinking Moms’ Revolution:  Autism Beyond the Spectrum:  Inspiring True Stories from Parents Fighting to Rescue Their Children” by Helen Conroy, Lisa Joyce Goes and Robert W….

The Importance of Retained Reflexes in Developmental Delays

The Importance of Retained Reflexes in Developmental Delays

The Importance of Retained Reflexes in Developmental Delays

by Sally Goddard Blythe Ever wonder why babies startle, grasp your finger or turn their heads toward an out-stretched arm?  These behaviors are primitive reflexes that emerge as early as nine weeks in utero, and are fully present at birth. Primitive reflexes are automatic movements, executed without thinking. They assist in the birthing process, are essential for the infant¹s survival in the first months of life, and provide training for many later skills. Primitive reflexes are considered “aberrant,” however, if they remain active beyond age 6 – 12 months.  They should be inhibited by the brain, allowing more sophisticated neural structures to develop. The continued presence of any of twelve primitive and postural reflexes is a sign of central nervous system (CNS) immaturity, which can have a profound impact upon a child¹s development, learning and behavior. What Do Retained Reflexes Have to Do with Learning and Behavior? Motor control lays the foundation for learning and self-control.  We acquire new skills…

Change:  Notice It, Adapt to It, Anticipate It, Go with It!

Change: Notice It, Adapt to It, Anticipate It, Go with It!

Change:  Notice It, Adapt to It, Anticipate It, Go with It!

By Patricia S. Lemer, M.S. Bus., NCC Everything changes:  winter to spring, summer to fall, youth to adolescence, health to illness. We expect, accept and adapt naturally to the irreversible cycles of the seasons and to aging. Changes from health to illness and illness to health are not so predictable and irreversible.  We can benefit from fine-tuning our responses to these changes. How people deal with change is the basis for a profound, little book, “Who Moved My Cheese?”, given to me by my dear friend Diana Henry, OTR.  Cheese, a metaphor for what we want in life, is elusive.  As I read the book, I saw how its wisdom can help us attain our “cheese” — good health and function for our kids. Change Happens; Notice It Health changes appear first in those subtle differences in skin, digestion and behavior.  Do those little bumps persist?  Is elimination less regular?  Are sleep patterns disturbed?  In many children these early warning…

Does Mitochondrial Dysfunction Finally Connect the Diverse Medical Symptoms We Now See in Children With Various Health Problems?

Does Mitochondrial Dysfunction Finally Connect the Diverse Medical Symptoms We Now See in Children With Various Health Problems?

Does Mitochondrial Dysfunction Finally Connect the Diverse Medical Symptoms We Now See in Children With Various Health Problems?

By Alyssa Davi, Parent Advocate What is mitochondrial disease and why may it be important to my child with developmental delay, low tone, GI problems, seizures, feeding problems, failure to gain weight, autism, diabetes or neuro-psychiatric symptoms? Research connecting mitochondrial disease and many diverse medical problems is increasing.  Dr. James Anderson, the Director of Program Coordination at the National Institute of Health (NIH) stated that the NIH currently funds more than half a billion dollars in mitochondrial research. Researchers are linking mitochondrial disease with everything from diabetes, autism, mood disorders, bi-polar disorder, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and even some cancers. Why would mitochondrial disease be involved in such a vast array of disorders?  The United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation states, Mitochondrial diseases are not one disease, but a group of metabolic diseases.  These diseases result from failures of the mitochondria, specialized organelles present in almost every cell of the body Mitochondria are responsible for providing more than 90% of the energy needed…

Vision Therapy for Neurodevelopmental Disorders Such as Autism

Vision Therapy for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Vision Therapy for Neurodevelopmental Disorders Such as Autism

by Maria Rickert Hong, Certified Holistic Health Counselor, AADP I am fortunate to have Dr. Randy Schulman, MS, OD, FCOVD, as my sons’ behavioral optometrist.  Dr. Schulman wrote the chapters on the role of vision therapy and optometry in Patty Lemer’s book, “Envisioning a Bright Future:  Interventions that Work for Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders“, which I reviewed earlier.  Patty was the one who recommended Dr. Schulman to me, and she practices in my area. Patty has always talked about the importance of vision therapy for people with autism, ADHD, sensory processing disorder (SPD), learning disabilities and other neurological disorders.  Now I know why.  In fact, Patty’s book was published by the Optometric Extension Program Foundation, which should give you a clue as to the importance of vision in neurodevelopmental disorders. Vision Problems a Cause of Many ASD Symptoms I was astounded to learn that vision problems are a CAUSE of, not a by-product of, many ASD symptoms. …

Increasing Interaction with Children with Multisystem Developmental Disorder

Increasing Interaction with Children with Multisystem Developmental Disorder

Increasing Interaction with Children with Multisystem Developmental Disorder

by Serena Wieder, PhD, Co-Author with Stanley Greenspan, MD, of The Child With Special Needs The first important goal in treating children with MultiSystem Developmental Disorder (MSDD) is developing spontaneous interactive behaviors that are purposeful and intentional. Described below are examples of methods that increase affect and help children relate to and communicate with others. These efforts require daily practice and can be incorporated into play sessions, FloorTime or other times when a caregiver devotes total attention to the child. The methods are part of the DIR (Developmental, Individual Differences, Relationship) model providing comprehensive approaches. Follow the leader. Do what the child does. Mutual attention develops through interaction. Never interrupt ongoing interactive play. Treat whatever the child is doing as intentional and purposeful. Your child may not know hot to initiate purposeful behaviors. By giving every move your utmost attention, interest and energy, you will convey that actions are meaningful- and will get a response. Extend the child’s desire and…

Sensory Processing Disorder and Social Interaction

Sensory Processing Disorder and Social Interaction

Sensory Processing Disorder and Social Interaction

by Patricia S. Lemer, MS. Bus., NCC, Chairman of the Board, Epidemic Answers This blog post focuses on autism, ADHD, developmental delays and Sensory Processing Disorder and social interaction. The emergence of appropriate social skills is the final step on the path to resolving developmental delays. Almost daily at my office, I welcome parents and their children who come for testing. As they enter, inevitably I hear, “Scott, say hi to Patty.” Scott may act dutifully, repeating the words rotely, without eye contact – or he may be mute. In the first instance, the parent is relieved; at least he talked. In the latter, she may be embarrassed. Appropriate Social Interaction: The Last Frontier Social skills lag behind until the child’s immune system works better, motor skills strengthen, language emerges, reading and mathematics develop, and handwriting becomes legible. When social skills get scant attention, inappropriate or poor interactions are the result. Recognizing that their child has few friends is painful…

Light, Water, and Air Quality: Improve Their Balance to Enhance Health

Light, Water, and Air Quality: Improve Their Balance to Enhance Health

Light, Water, and Air Quality: Improve Their Balance to Enhance Health

By Patricia S. Lemer, MS.Bus., NCC, Chairman of the Board, Epidemic Answers Some simple improvements can help those with allergies, asthma and developmental problems: light, water and air. When these are in balance, life flourishes; when balance is upset, so is development. Since ancient times, Eastern philosophy has viewed the healer as a gardener who facilitates nature in making the body days grow.  This holistic approach is in marked contrast to that of western doctors who view the body as a machine and themselves as chemists and engineers who replace or repair faulty components.  Just as a plant depends on light, water and air, so does the human body. Both are dynamic, self-regulating systems that transform light and water into tissues.  A healthy organism can be resilient against adversity.  Plants can withstand drought, storms, and plagues; appropriately growing children can tolerate foods, pollution and animal dander. Recently, a friend consulted me: “My son is bringing home his girlfriend, and she…

Light Sensitivity and Autism, ADHD, SPD and Developmental Delays

Light Sensitivity and Autism, ADHD, SPD and Developmental Delays

Light Sensitivity and Autism, ADHD, SPD and Developmental Delays

by Robin Mumford While the causes of developmental delays are very complex and require intervention on many fronts, simply changing the lighting can be a beneficial addition to other forms of treatment.  Many children are excessively sensitive to the quality of the lighting and may overreact. Light sensitivity and autism, ADHD, SPD and developmental delays is common. This hypersensitivity is complicated by visual stress-­producing factors that overload their visual environment and confuse their eyes and brains.  To create this effect, you need not flash strobe lights.  You need only combine mobiles hanging from the ceiling with busy bulletin boards and over-crowded cubbies. Usually children are quite unaware of the origin of their discomfort.  Added to environmental stress are symptoms of below-par visual skills that many of these children have: Rapid fatigue, while reading or looking at a picture book. Tendency to lose the place on the page Tendency to read too quickly, with poor pronunciation and little recall of what…

Biomedical Testing for Autism, ADHD, SPD and Chronic Disorders

Biomedical Testing for Autism, ADHD, SPD and Chronic Disorders

Biomedical Testing for Autism, ADHD, SPD and Chronic Disorders

by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LND, Co-Founder, Developmental Delay Resources Medical testing has changed dramatically over the last few years, despite our attempts to cling to the illusions of the past.  The familiar family doctor, who knew which test to order, to evaluate every possible problem, is long gone.  This blog post is about biomedical testing for autism, ADHD, SPD and chronic disorders such as asthma, allergies and mood disorders. Today, often a harried stranger is trying to serve too many patients while being relentlessly pressured by laboratories, insurance companies and pharmaceutical firms to run tests, prescribe drugs, and save money, all at the same time. For the families of children with developmental delays, seeking medical care is more complex because there is no standard protocol for such a diverse population.  The tests sold to insurance companies-and, therefore, to you through your doctor because they are reimbursable – are useful for only a small percentage of the developmentally-delayed population. For instance,…