Acid Reflux in Children

Acid Reflux in Children

Acid Reflux in Children

by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LND Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Disorder (GERD) is a diagnosis I am encountering in my practice with increased frequency. Yet, little is written about it. Frequent vomiting is the most obvious indicator, but other symptoms of acid reflux in children include: Irritability (from esophageal pain during or after eating) Poor sleep Food intolerance Refusing foods (or oral intolerance) Difficulty swallowing Gagging, choking (especially with liquids) Sour breath What Is Reflux? Although many babies spit up, are irritable, and sleep poorly, GERD is present only when symptoms persist and become severe. The stomach contents consistently back up into the esophagus, and the acid and food combination can burp up the back of the throat or be projected through the mouth or nose. Most professionals believe that an improperly functioning sphincter valve at the top of the stomach is the cause of GERD. The valve pops open too easily when the child consumes an irritant, overeats or just bends…

road to recovery sign

The “R” Word: Sensory Processing Disorder Recovery

road to recovery sign

You may or may not know my personal recovery story. I have recovered my 2 sons, now ages 5 and 7, from sensory processing disorder (SPD), asthma, allergies, acid reflux and eczema with a biomedical approach, which means correcting nutritional and hormonal deficiencies, removing toxicities and correcting gut dysbiosis. Most people don’t know that sensory processing disorder recovery is possible, but my sons have recovered from it. I’m still working on failure to thrive, mitochondrial dysfunction, hypothyroidism and persistent eczema in my older son. In addition, they both had developmental delays, and my older son had severe hypotonia as a baby. I have recovered from immune dysregulation, in which I had shingles twice, the worst case of poison-ivy ever, bronchitis (which I’d never had before), constant sinus infections and constant colds that would last 3-4 weeks at a time. My older son had immune dysregulation, too, when he was younger: he would go to preschool, get sick and be out…

Is It Fatigue or Is It Mitochondrial Dysfunction?

Is It Fatigue or Is It Mitochondrial Dysfunction?

Is It Fatigue or Is It Mitochondrial Dysfunction?

Because of my son’s failure to thrive, our pediatrician sent us to see Vicki Kobliner, a holistic nutritionist, who’s also on the board of Epidemic Answers with me. Given that Crane Man has constant fatigue and stomach pain, poor growth, mild sensory issues and developmental delays, Vicki suggested having preliminary tests for mitochondrial dysfunction done. Checking the levels of carnitine, lactic acid, pyruvic acid, alinine and lysine are easy preliminary screening tests that can be done from a standard blood-test lab like Quest Diagnostics. Having symptoms across 3 or more organ systems is suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction. Crane Man’s developmental delay is a symptom of brain dysfunction; His GI problems and former acid reflux are symptoms of muscular dysfunction; His possible hypoglycemia is a symptom of liver dysfunction; His failure to thrive, fatigue and former unexplained vomiting are symptoms of system dysfunction. At this point, you’re probably scratching your head, thinking “Mitochondria, I vaguely remember something about that from high…

Failure to Thrive

Failure to Thrive

Failure to Thrive

“Failure to thrive” is when your child’s weight percentile falls to the 3rdpercentile or below or when it crosses 2 or more major percentile curves.  When either of these (or both, as in the case of my older son) happens, it’s an indication that the child is not growing as he or she should be. I could scream every time someone tells me that I’m not that big or my husband’s not that big, so my sons’ failure to thrive is something I shouldn’t worry about.  Or how about when I’m told to stop comparing my kids to fat American kids?  I’m NOT comparing my boys to other kids.  I’m comparing them to THEMSELVES.  That’s the point of a growth percentile curve.  A child is born at a certain height and weight, which puts them on a growth-percentile curve, and they should track that curve.  Otherwise, what’s the point of having these curves? For example, my older son was born…

Healing Eczema with Food

Healing Eczema with Food

Healing Eczema with Food

My sons have had eczema their whole lives.  It has ranged from cradle cap (did you know that was a form of eczema?) to itchy bumps in the creases of the knees and elbows to full-blown bloody red rashes on the arms and legs. Pediatricians, as usual (sorry!), were useless in treating eczema.  Their standard advice was to “put a little cortisone cream on it”.  I did try that a few times at first with my older son, but I quickly grew worried about the effects of it on his already-poor immune system.  Cortisone cream is a steroid, and steroids suppress the immune system.  Not only that, but I learned that suppressing eczema with cortisone cream can lead to asthma. Most times, we just put up with the itchiness, but this winter, my older son’s eczema was the worst I had ever seen.  There was an itchy, red rash all over his thighs and horrible itchy bumps all around his…

How My Heavy Metal Poisoning Damaged My Sons

How My Heavy Metal Poisoning Damaged My Sons

How My Heavy Metal Poisoning Damaged My Sons

After finding out that I had heavy metal poisoning, I immediately thought about my sons.  Was it possible that I had passed any of this on to them? Could this be responsible for their sensory processing disorder (SPD), asthma, allergies, eczema, acid reflux, and developmental delays? Would I finally find the common thread that I had been looking for all along that tied all of these conditions together? Yes, unfortunately. My Sons’ Heavy-Metal Toxicity After finding out about my toxicity, I had both sons tested with a heavy-metal hair test because it’s not invasive.  My older son was in the 97th percentile for heavy-metal toxicity; my younger at the 90th. That means that my older son had more heavy metals in him than 97% of people in the reference group, which contains roughly 40,000 people. Heavy Metal Reference Range (g/g) Older Son (g/g) Younger Son (g/g) Aluminum <8.000 16.000 13.000 Antimony <0.066 0.110 0.210 Arsenic <0.080 0.047 0.098 Barium <0.500…

Asthma and Dairy

Asthma and Dairy

Asthma and Dairy

My older son got sick a lot, especially after he started preschool when he was 3. He would go to preschool for a week then be out the whole next week because he was sick; the preschool didn’t want kids coming in who were sneezing and coughing. Constant Sickness Turned to Asthma When he was 4 years old, he had a severe asthmatic episode after we went to Los Angeles to visit my husband’s family. We woke up the first morning after we landed in LA to discover that the whole valley where his parents lived was engulfed in smoke from forest fires in the San Gabriel Mountains. They stayed on fire the entire week we were there, and, although we didn’t go out in the smoke too much, we couldn’t help but breathe in some of it in. When we came back home, he had a severe asthmatic attack, which he had never had before.  It was so bad…

Acid Reflux in Babies:  Another Red Flag

Acid Reflux in Babies: Another Red Flag

Acid Reflux in Babies:  Another Red Flag

by Maria Rickert Hong, CHHC, AADP Acid reflux in babies:  Both of my sons had acid reflux as babies.  Prevacid wasn’t the answer; undoing their gut dysbiosis was. When my younger son was born, he, too, was “fussy” and “colicky”.  He had an outright problem with nursing:  he refused to. When he would, he would shriek in pain or fill up so much (probably because he was starving) that he would throw it right back up. Again, this wasn’t a little “spitting up”; this was projectile vomiting and, by now, I had become used to having stains on the rug, chairs and clothes that simply wouldn’t come out. The pediatrician referred a lactation specialist who recommended that I cut out all dairy products from my diet.  She said that dairy was the most likely culprit in causing pain to my son. Probiotics Not Enough She also recommended that I take a probiotic, “the refrigerated kind, like they sell at Whole…

What Is Gut Dysbiosis?

What Is Gut Dysbiosis?

What Is Gut Dysbiosis?

Gut dysbiosis — this topic is the motherlode.  It’s one of the two core (in my opinion) reasons for the explosion of chronic childhood illnesses we see today. Gut Dysbiosis:  A Common Link Among the Epidemic of Children’s Chronic Illnesses First, let’s discuss the numbers behind this epidemic:  How many kids did you know when you were growing up that had autism, ADHD, acid reflux, allergies, asthma, developmental delays and/or mental health issues? I knew of only ONE child with any one of these in the whole time I went to school from elementary school to high school.  Now that I am a mom, I can tell you that it’s the rare child who does NOT have any chronic illnesses.  The statistics for today’s kids are staggering: 1 in 6 African-American children has asthma; 1 of every 8 children has it 1 in 5 children has allergic eczema 2-3 out of every 5 children have hay fever 1 in 3…

Recovery from Sensory Processing Disorder, Reflux, Asthma, Eczema

Sensory Processing Disorder Symptoms

Recovery from Sensory Processing Disorder, Reflux, Asthma, Eczema

If I were to tell you that both of my sons have Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), you might: a) ask, what is that? b) ask, how did you know that they have it? or c) not believe me unless you had met them – especially my older son – a few years ago. I believe that they are mostly recovered because of occupational therapy (OT) interventions over the course of a year and a half and because of ongoing naturopathic medicine and dietary changes. My goal here in this article is to help other parents understand what SPD is and what can be done about it. To answer the first question, people with SPD have a problem with the wiring from their nervous system to their brain; SPD is a neurological disorder.  SPD is usually more noticeable in kids; most adults have learned to compensate. Sensory Seekers and Sensory Avoiders There are two kinds of people with SPD: sensory seekers…